The Management of Violence in a Conflict Organization: The Case of the Abu Sayyaf

Abstract

The Abu Sayyaf is an organization which has left a trail of mayhem and murder in the southern Philippines for more than a decade. It has gained international notoriety through several high profile mass kidnappings. This article looks at how the Abu Sayyaf has managed to survive and at times prosper despite the state's efforts to eradicate it. By using organizational analysis the paper demonstrates how the Abu Sayyaf has developed structures and processes which make it such a deadly force. The organization has succeeded in gaining considerable fit with the environment in which it operates.

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Turner, M. The Management of Violence in a Conflict Organization: The Case of the Abu Sayyaf. Public Organization Review 3, 387–401 (2003). https://doi.org/10.1023/B:PORJ.0000004816.29771.0f

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  • terrorism
  • management of violence
  • secession
  • environmental fit
  • Moro nation
  • Philippines