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Depression After Traumatic Brain Injury: A Review of Evidence for Clinical Heterogeneity

Abstract

Depression represents a major source of disability among individuals who have suffered a traumatic brain injury (TBI), with estimates of prevalence in this population ranging over 50%. In comparison with other sequelae of TBI, depression is often poorly conceptualized and treated among acute care and rehabilitation professionals. One reason for this is the lack of clear etiological models for the development of depression following TBI. This paper argues that post-TBI depression actually represents a heterogeneous category, with multiple etiologic pathways and clinical implications. The literature in this area is reviewed, with an emphasis on an appreciation of the diversity within this clinical population. Conclusions focus on suggestions for differential diagnosis and treatment options.

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Moldover, J.E., Goldberg, K.B. & Prout, M.F. Depression After Traumatic Brain Injury: A Review of Evidence for Clinical Heterogeneity. Neuropsychol Rev 14, 143–154 (2004). https://doi.org/10.1023/B:NERV.0000048181.46159.61

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  • DOI: https://doi.org/10.1023/B:NERV.0000048181.46159.61

  • rehabilitation
  • differential diagnosis
  • depression
  • traumatic brain injury