Mycopathologia

, Volume 157, Issue 1, pp 117–126 | Cite as

Analysis of Fusarium Graminearum Mycotoxins in Different Biological Matrices by LC/MS

  • A.C. Bily
  • L.M. Reid
  • M.E. Savard
  • R. Reddy
  • B.A. Blackwell
  • C.M. Campbell
  • A. Krantis
  • T. Durst
  • B.J.R. Philogéne
  • J.T. Arnason
  • C. Regnault-Roger

Abstract

The purpose of this study was to develop an LC/MS assay to accuratelydetect three mycotoxins produced by Fusarium graminearum in various matrices. Using different LC conditions, deoxynivalenol (DON), 15-acetyldeoxynivalenol (15-ADON), and zearalenone (ZEN) were detected in four different matrices (fungalliquid cultures, maize grain, insect larvae and pig serum). The sensitivity of MS detection allowed us to detect concentrations as low as 8 ppb of DON and 12 ppb of ZEN. A very small quantity of matrix was therefore necessary for successful analysis of these toxinsand a variety of experimental situations were successfully investigated using this technique. Production of 15-ADON and butenolide was monitored in a liquid culture of F. graminearum under controlled conditions. Using simple extraction procedures,the differential accumulation of DON and 15-ADON was followed in inoculated maize genotypes varying in susceptibility to F. graminearum. Toxicokinetic studies were carried outwith maize insect pests reared continually on artificial diets containing ZEN and suggested that larvae may possess the ability to degrade ZEN. Finally, persistence of DON was assessed in pigs fed diet supplemented with DON, results indicated that DON accumulates quickly in pig blood and then levels decline progressively for 12 hours thereafter. TheLC/MS study reported here is very useful and flexible for the detection of these mycotoxins in different media and at very low concentrations.

LC/MS Fusarium graminearum matrices deoxynivalenol zearalenone toxicokinetic 

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Copyright information

© Kluwer Academic Publishers 2004

Authors and Affiliations

  • A.C. Bily
    • 1
    • 2
  • L.M. Reid
    • 3
  • M.E. Savard
    • 3
  • R. Reddy
    • 1
  • B.A. Blackwell
    • 3
  • C.M. Campbell
    • 4
  • A. Krantis
    • 4
  • T. Durst
    • 1
  • B.J.R. Philogéne
    • 1
  • J.T. Arnason
    • 1
  • C. Regnault-Roger
    • 2
  1. 1.Departments of Biology and ChemistryUniversity of OttawaOttawaCanada
  2. 2.Laboratoire d'écologie Moléculaire, Institut de Biologie de l'Environnement Aquitaine-Sud IBEASUniversité de Pau et des Pays de l'Adour, PauFrance
  3. 3.Eastern Cereal and Oilseed Research Centre, Central Experimental Farm, Agriculture and Agri-Food CanadaOttawaCanada
  4. 4.Department of Cell and Molecular MedicineUniversity of OttawaCanada

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