Journal of Science Education and Technology

, Volume 13, Issue 2, pp 147–159 | Cite as

Some Student Misconceptions in Chemistry: A Literature Review of Chemical Bonding

  • Haluk Özmen
Article

Abstract

Students' misconceptions before or after formal instruction have become a major concern among researchers in science education because they influence how students learn new scientific knowledge, play an essential role in subsequent learning and become a hindrance in acquiring the correct body of knowledge. In this paper some students' misconceptions on chemical bonding reported in the literature were investigated and presented. With this aim, a detailed literature review of chemical bonding was carried out and the collected data was presented from past to day historically. On the basis of the results some suggestions for teaching were made.

chemistry misconception chemical bonding 

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Copyright information

© Plenum Publishing Corporation 2004

Authors and Affiliations

  • Haluk Özmen
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Science Education, Fatih Faculty of EducationKaradeniz Technical UniversitySogutlu-TrabzonTurkey

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