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Why Rational Emotive Behavior Therapy Is the Most Comprehensive and Effective Form of Behavior Therapy

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Correspondence to Albert Ellis.

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Ellis, A. Why Rational Emotive Behavior Therapy Is the Most Comprehensive and Effective Form of Behavior Therapy. Journal of Rational-Emotive & Cognitive-Behavior Therapy 22, 85–92 (2004). https://doi.org/10.1023/B:JORE.0000025439.78389.52

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Keywords

  • Public Health
  • Behavior Therapy
  • Emotive Behavior
  • Rational Emotive Behavior Therapy