Journal of Primary Prevention

, Volume 24, Issue 3, pp 199–221 | Cite as

Taking Stock and Putting Stock in Primary Prevention: Characteristics of Effective Programs

  • Lynne A. Bond
  • Amy M. Carmola Hauf
Article

Abstract

We argue it is important regularly to take stock of what makes primary prevention and promotion programs in mental health effective and to use this information to guide future program design, implementation, and evaluation. Based upon a review of diverse program evaluations, including meta-analyses and best practices approaches, we identify 10 distinct (but interdependent) characteristics of effective primary prevention and promotion programs that should frame future work. We also note the importance of community-based collaboration for achieving these 10 features.

primary prevention effective prevention programs prevention program guidelines 

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Copyright information

© Human Sciences Press, Inc. 2004

Authors and Affiliations

  • Lynne A. Bond
    • 1
  • Amy M. Carmola Hauf
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of PsychologyThe University of VermontBurlington

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