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Journal of Family Violence

, Volume 19, Issue 1, pp 49–57 | Cite as

Comparing Women and Men Arrested for Domestic Violence: A Preliminary Report

  • Amy L. Busch
  • Mindy S. Rosenberg
Article

Abstract

This study uses criminal justice data to compare women and men arrested for domestic violence on their levels of violence, reported victimization, general criminality, and substance abuse. Participants were 45 women and 45 men convicted of domestic violence between 1996 and 1998. Results indicate that women were less likely than men to have a history of domestic violence offenses and nonviolent crimes. They were also more likely to report that they had been injured or victimized by their partner at the time of their arrest. However, in other ways, women and men were similar: they were equally likely to have used severe violence and inflicted severe injuries on their victims; to have previously committed violence against nonintimates; and to have been using drugs or alcohol at the time of their arrest. The implications for treatment for women arrested for domestic violence are discussed.

domestic violence arrest women men gender 

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Copyright information

© Plenum Publishing Corporation 2004

Authors and Affiliations

  • Amy L. Busch
    • 1
  • Mindy S. Rosenberg
    • 2
  1. 1.Department of PsychologyUniversity of CaliforniaBerkeley
  2. 2.Independent PracticeSausalito

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