Journal of Archaeological Method and Theory

, Volume 10, Issue 4, pp 323–368 | Cite as

Domesticated Landscapes: The Subsistence Ecology of Plant and Animal Domestication

  • John Edward Terrell
  • John P. Hart
  • Sibel Barut
  • Nicoletta Cellinese
  • Antonio Curet
  • Tim Denham
  • Chapurukha M. Kusimba
  • Kyle Latinis
  • Rahul Oka
  • Joel Palka
  • Mary E. D. Pohl
  • Kevin O. Pope
  • Patrick Ryan Williams
  • Helen Haines
  • John E. Staller

Abstract

Harvesting different species as foods or raw materials calls for differing skills depending on the species being harvested and the circumstances under which they are being taken. In some situations and for some species, the tactics used are mainly behavioral—that is, people adjust, or adapt, their own actions to fit the behavior and circumstances of the species they are taking. Under other circumstances and for other species, the skills and tactics used may call for greater environmental preparation or manipulation. Therefore, instead of trying to distinguish people today and in the past as either “foragers” or “farmers,” it makes sense to define human subsistence behavior as an interactive matrix of species and harvesting tactics, that is, as a provisions spreadsheet.

ecology landscapes foraging farming 

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Copyright information

© Plenum Publishing Corporation 2003

Authors and Affiliations

  • John Edward Terrell
    • 1
  • John P. Hart
    • 1
  • Sibel Barut
    • 1
  • Nicoletta Cellinese
    • 1
  • Antonio Curet
    • 1
  • Tim Denham
    • 1
  • Chapurukha M. Kusimba
    • 1
  • Kyle Latinis
    • 1
  • Rahul Oka
    • 1
  • Joel Palka
    • 1
  • Mary E. D. Pohl
    • 1
  • Kevin O. Pope
    • 1
  • Patrick Ryan Williams
    • 1
  • Helen Haines
    • 1
  • John E. Staller
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of AnthropologyThe Field MuseumChicago

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