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“A Solitary Place of Retreat”: Renaissance Privacy and Irish Architecture

Abstract

Many specialists in architectural history assign the beginning of an explicitly-articulated need for privacy to any time between the twelfth and nineteenth centuries, and they identify elements such as closets, hallways, and separate servant quarters as indicators of that need. Meanings assigned to privacy range from the retirement of the lord and lady from the great hall into the chamber, to the withdrawal of the nuclear family in the home, and to a psychological need of the individual human being to be alone. This paper examines the problem of privacy and its architectural manifestations using case-studies from sixteenth- and seventeenth-century Ireland.

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Ronnes, H. “A Solitary Place of Retreat”: Renaissance Privacy and Irish Architecture. International Journal of Historical Archaeology 8, 101–117 (2004). https://doi.org/10.1023/B:IJHA.0000043696.20362.e6

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  • DOI: https://doi.org/10.1023/B:IJHA.0000043696.20362.e6

  • privacy
  • castle architecture
  • Ireland
  • Renaissance