Innovative Higher Education

, Volume 29, Issue 2, pp 137–154 | Cite as

The Articulated Learning: An Approach to Guided Reflection and Assessment

  • Sarah L. Ash
  • Patti H. Clayton
Article

Abstract

The value of reflection on experience to enhance learning has been advanced for decades; however, it remains difficult to apply in practice. This paper describes a reflection model that pushes students beyond superficial interpretations of complex issues and facilitates academic mastery, personal growth, civic engagement, critical thinking, and the meaningful demonstration of learning. Although developed in a service-learning program, its general features can support reflection on a range of experiences. It is accessible to both students and instructors, regardless of discipline; and it generates written products that can be used for formative and summative assessment of student learning.

reflection service-learning assessment 

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, Inc. 2004

Authors and Affiliations

  • Sarah L. Ash
    • 1
  • Patti H. Clayton
    • 2
  1. 1.Departments of Animal Science and Family and Consumer SciencesNorth Carolina State UniversityUSA
  2. 2.NC State Service-Learning ProgramFaculty Center for Teaching and LearningUSA

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