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Innovative Higher Education

, Volume 29, Issue 1, pp 21–48 | Cite as

Faculty at Mid-Career: A Program to Enhance Teaching and Learning

  • John L. Romano
  • Rae Hoesing
  • Kathleen O'Donovan
  • Joyce Weinsheimer
Article

Abstract

While the number of mid-career faculty currently in U.S. higher education is significant, professional development programming that addresses the teaching and learning issues of this population has not been a priority. This article describes the Mid-Career Teaching Program (MCTP) and presents data that assesses its impact on participants' professional and personal lives. Survey and interview results indicate positive changes in teaching behaviors and knowledge as well as an increase in teaching satisfaction and confidence. Faculty also reported that MCTP renewed their energy and enthusiasm and positively impacted their life outside of the academy.

mid-career faculty development faculty vitality career span renewal 

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Copyright information

© Human Sciences Press, Inc. 2004

Authors and Affiliations

  • John L. Romano
  • Rae Hoesing
  • Kathleen O'Donovan
  • Joyce Weinsheimer

There are no affiliations available

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