Canine Visitors: The Influence of Therapy Dogs on Young Children's Learning and Well-Being in Classrooms and Hospitals

Abstract

Trained therapy dogs are becoming an increasingly common sight in many educational and health care settings. This article, coauthored by a college professor, a Therapy Dogs International, Inc., Evaluator and local program director, and a registered nurse reviews the research on using registered therapy dogs as adjuncts in school programs and health care treatment plans for children ages 5–8. It addresses to the most commonly raised objections to allowing dogs in classrooms and patient rooms and offers practical guidelines for maximizing the positive outcomes of animal-assisted activities and therapy (AAA/T).

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Jalongo, M.R., Astorino, T. & Bomboy, N. Canine Visitors: The Influence of Therapy Dogs on Young Children's Learning and Well-Being in Classrooms and Hospitals. Early Childhood Education Journal 32, 9–16 (2004). https://doi.org/10.1023/B:ECEJ.0000039638.60714.5f

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  • pet therapy
  • animal-assisted activities
  • animal-assisted therapy
  • Therapy Dogs International, Inc.