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Enhancements to the Behavioral Parent Training Paradigm for Families of Children with ADHD: Review and Future Directions

  • Andrea M. ChronisEmail author
  • Anil Chacko
  • Gregory A. Fabiano
  • Brian T. Wymbs
  • William E. PelhamJr.
Article

Abstract

Behavioral parent training (BPT) is one of the empirically supported psychosocial treatments for ADHD. Over many years and in many studies, BPT has been documented to improve both child ADHD behavior and maladaptive parenting behavior. In some studies, BPT has also been found to result in benefits in additional domains, such as parenting stress and child classroom behavior. However, the BPT literature on children selected as having ADHD lags behind research conducted on BPT for children selected as having oppositional defiant and conduct disorders (ODD and CD, respectively) with regard to examination of factors that may limit treatment attainment, compliance, and outcomes, such as single parenthood, parental psychopathology, and child comorbidity. Because of the high degree of comorbidity between ADHD and ODD/CD, it is difficult to separate the two BPT literatures. The parameters of BPT (e.g., format and setting), parent factors, and child factors that may contribute to treatment outcomes for families of children with ADHD are reviewed here and recommendations for future BPT research in the area of ADHD are made.

ADHD parent training psychosocial treatment treatment outcome parenting 

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Copyright information

© Plenum Publishing Corporation 2004

Authors and Affiliations

  • Andrea M. Chronis
    • 1
    Email author
  • Anil Chacko
    • 2
  • Gregory A. Fabiano
    • 2
  • Brian T. Wymbs
    • 2
  • William E. PelhamJr.
    • 2
  1. 1.Department of PsychologyUniversity of Maryland
  2. 2.Department of Psychology, University at BuffaloState University of New YorkNew York

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