Biomedical Microdevices

, Volume 6, Issue 3, pp 183–190 | Cite as

Continuous On-Chip Micropumping for Microneedle Enhanced Drug Delivery

  • Jeffrey D. Zahn
  • Ajay deshmukh
  • Albert P. Pisano
  • Dorian Liepmann

Abstract

Microneedles are promising microfabricated devices for minimally invasive drug delivery applications. Needles can be integrated into a variety of devices. However, any portable drug delivery device with integrated microneedles will need an equally compact means to deliver therapeutics. This work presents microneedles integrated with an on-chip MEMS positive displacement micropump for continuous drug delivery applications. The generation and collapse of thermally generated bubbles with flow rectified by directional check valves are used to achieve net pumping through the device. Visualization methods have observed net flow rates of water out of a microneedle at approximately 2.0 nl/s with a pressure of 3.9 kPa. In addition, continuous pumping was achieved for more than 6 hours with the heaters actuating for over 18 hours (15,000 cycles) without failing.

microneedle micropump drug delivery 

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Copyright information

© Kluwer Academic Publishers 2004

Authors and Affiliations

  • Jeffrey D. Zahn
    • 1
  • Ajay deshmukh
    • 2
  • Albert P. Pisano
    • 2
  • Dorian Liepmann
    • 2
  1. 1.Department of BioengineeringPennsylvania State University and Berkeley Sensor and Actuator Center, University of California at Berkeley and Department of Bioengineering, University of California at BerkeleyU.S.A
  2. 2.Berkeley Sensor and Actuator CenterUniversity of California at Berkeley and Department of Mechanical Engineering, 497 Cory Hall, University of California at BerkeleyBerkeleyU.S.A

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