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Biodiversity & Conservation

, Volume 13, Issue 3, pp 635–657 | Cite as

The re-stocking of captive-bred ruffed lemurs (Varecia variegata variegata) into the Betampona Reserve, Madagascar: methodology and recommendations

  • Adam Britt
  • Charles Welch
  • Andrea Katz
  • Bernard Iambana
  • Ingrid Porton
  • Randall Junge
  • Graham Crawford
  • Cathy Williams
  • David Haring
Article

Abstract

Since November 1997 the Madagascar Fauna Group has released 13 captive-bred black and white ruffed lemurs (Varecia variegata variegata) into the Betampona Reserve in eastern Madagascar. The release programme has three major aims: (1) to assess the ability of captive-bred V. v. variegata to adapt to life in their natural habitat; (2) to investigate the contribution that such a release programme can make to reinforcing the existing small wild population of V. v. variegata in Betampona; and (3) to contribute to the long-term protection and conservation of the reserve. Criteria for the selection of release candidates, veterinary screening and pre-release experience in naturalistic environments are described and discussed. Methods for post-release monitoring of health and behaviour are covered in detail. The importance of considering the social dynamics of the species involved is emphasised. The survival of five of the releasees, plus successful reproduction and integration with the wild population have led to the conclusion that the release was a success.

Captive breeding Conservation Madagascar Prosimians Re-introduction 

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Copyright information

© Kluwer Academic Publishers 2004

Authors and Affiliations

  • Adam Britt
    • 1
    • 5
  • Charles Welch
    • 2
  • Andrea Katz
    • 2
    • 4
  • Bernard Iambana
    • 2
  • Ingrid Porton
    • 3
  • Randall Junge
    • 3
  • Graham Crawford
  • Cathy Williams
    • 4
  • David Haring
    • 4
  1. 1.Madagascar Fauna GroupSan FranciscoUSA
  2. 2.Madagascar Fauna GroupToamasinaMadagascar
  3. 3.St. Louis ZooSt. LouisUSA
  4. 4.Duke University Primate CenterDurhamUSA
  5. 5.Herbarium, Royal Botanic GardensKew, Richmond, SurreyUK

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