Biotechnology Letters

, Volume 26, Issue 13, pp 1077–1088 | Cite as

Phospholipase-mediated preparation of 1-ricinoleoyl-2-acyl-sn- glycero-3-phosphocholine from soya and egg phosphatidylcholine

  • T. Vijeeta
  • J.R.C. Reddy
  • B.V.S.K. Rao
  • M.S.L. Karuna
  • R.B.N. Prasad
Article

Abstract

1-Ricinoleoyl-2-acyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine was prepared by incorporating ricinoleic acid completely in the sn-1 position of egg and soya phosphatidylcholine (PC) using immobilized phospholipase A1 as the catalyst. The optimum reaction conditions for maximum incorporation of ricinoleic acid into PC through transesterification were 10% (w/w) immobilized enzyme (116 mg), a 1:5 mol ratio of PC (soya, 387 mg; egg, 384 mg) to methyl ricinoleate (780 mg) at 50 °C for 24 h in hexane.

egg lecithin phosphatidylcholine phospholipase A1 ricinoleic acid soya lecithin 

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Copyright information

© Kluwer Academic Publishers 2004

Authors and Affiliations

  • T. Vijeeta
    • 1
  • J.R.C. Reddy
    • 1
  • B.V.S.K. Rao
    • 1
  • M.S.L. Karuna
    • 1
  • R.B.N. Prasad
    • 1
  1. 1.Division of Lipid Science and TechnologyIndian Institute of Chemical TechnologyHyderabadIndia

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