Skip to main content

Lipase-producing microorganisms from a Kenyan alkaline soda lake

Abstract

Lipolytic enzyme production of 150 isolated strains from samples of Lake Bogoria (Kenya) was examined. Among these, fifteen isolates were selected on the basis of their lipolytic activities and subjected to morphological and 16S rRNA gene sequencing analyses for their identification. All the microorganisms have been selected under culture conditions with pH ranges between 7–10 and temperatures of 37–55 °C. Most of them showed optimal growth at 37 °C and tolerated salinity up to 10% (w/v). Ten of the isolates were Gram-negative, nine of which were closely related to the Pseudomonas cluster and one to the Halomonas cluster sharing high similarity profile with Halomonas desiderata. The remaining Gram-positive isolates were closely related to the Bacillus cluster, and were grouped with Bacillus halodurans, Bacillus alcalophilus and Bacillus licheniformis. Four members of the Bacillus cluster and the Halomonas sp. produced lipolytic activity under alkaline conditions, while others did so at neutral pH values.

This is a preview of subscription content, access via your institution.

References

  1. Bell PJL, Nevalainen H, Morgan HW, Bergquist PL (1999) Rapid cloning of thermoalkalophilic lipases from Bacillus sp. using PCR. Biotechnol. Lett. 21: 1003–1006.

    Google Scholar 

  2. Franzmann PD, Wehmeyer U, Stackebrandt E (1988) Halomonadacea fam. nov., a new family of the class proteobacteria to accommodate the genera Halomonas and Deleya. Syst. Appl. Microbiol. 11: 16–19.

    Google Scholar 

  3. Gerhardt P, Murray RGE, Wood WA, Krieg NR (1994) Methods for General and Molecular Bacteriology. Washington, DC: American Society for Microbiology.

    Google Scholar 

  4. Gessesse A, Gashe BA (1997) Production of alkaline protease by an alkaliphilic bacteria isolated from an alkaline soda lake. Biotechnol. Lett. 19: 479–481.

    Google Scholar 

  5. Grant WD, Jones BE, Mwatha WE (1990) Alkaliphiles: ecology, diversity and applications. FEMS Microbiol. Rev. 75: 255–270.

    Google Scholar 

  6. Jaeger KE, Reetz MT (1998) Microbial lipases form versatile tools for biotechnology. Trends Biotechnol. 16: 396–403.

    Google Scholar 

  7. Johnson JL (1994) Similarity analysis of DNAs. In: Gerhart P, Murray RGE, Wood WA, Krieg NR, eds. Methods for General and Molecular Bacteriology. Washington, DC: American Society for Microbiology, pp. 655–682.

    Google Scholar 

  8. Jones BE, Grant WD, Duckworth AW, Owenson GG (1998) Microbial diversity of soda lakes. Extremophiles 2: 191–200.

    Google Scholar 

  9. Kouker G, Jaeger KE (1987) Specific and sensitive plate assay for bacterial lipases. Appl. Environ. Microbiol. 53: 211–213.

    Google Scholar 

  10. Lee D, Koh S, Kim K, Kim B, Choi H, Kim D, Suhartono M, Pyun Y (1999) Isolation and characterization of a thermophilic lipase from Bacillus thermoleovorans ID-1. FEMS Microbiol. Lett. 179: 393–400.

    Google Scholar 

  11. Litthauer D, Ginster A, van Eeden Skein E (2002) Pseudomonas luteola lipase: a new member of the 320-residue Pseudomonas lipase family. Enzyme Microb. Technol. 30: 209–215.

    Google Scholar 

  12. Logan NA, Berkeley CW (1984) Identification of Bacillus strains using the API System. J. Gen. Microbiol. 130: 1871–1882.

    Google Scholar 

  13. Maidak BL, Coloe JR, Lilburn TG, Parker Jr CT, Saxman PR, Stredwick JM, Garrity GM, Li B, Olsen GJ, Pramanik S, Schmidt TM, Tiedje JM (2000) The RDP (Ribosomal Database Project) continues. Nucl. Acids Res. 28: 173–174.

    Google Scholar 

  14. Marmur J (1961) A procedure for the isolation of deoxyribonucleic acid from microorganisms. J. Mol. Biol. 3, 208–218.

    Google Scholar 

  15. Martins R, Davids W, Al-Soud WA, Levander F, Rådström P, Hatti-Kaul R (2001) Starch-hydrolyzing bacteria from Ethiopian soda lakes. Extremophiles 5: 135–144.

    Google Scholar 

  16. Nthangeni M, Patterton, van Tonder A, Vergeer W, Litthauer D (2001) Over-expression and properties of a purified recombinant Bacillus licheniformis lipase: a comparative report on Bacillus lipases. Enzyme Microb. Technol. 28: 705–712.

    Google Scholar 

  17. Rathi P, Bradoo S, Saxena RK, Gupta R (2000) A hyperthermostable, alkaline lipase from Pseudomonas sp. with the property of thermal activation. Biotechnol. Lett. 22: 495–498.

    Google Scholar 

  18. Rees HC, Grant S, Jones B, Grant WD, Heaphy S (2003) Detecting cellulase and esterase enzyme activities encoded by novel genes present in environmental DNA libraries. Extremophiles 7: 415–421.

    Google Scholar 

  19. Saitou N, Nei M (1987) The neighbour-joining method: a new method for reconstructing phylogenetic trees. Mol. Biol. Evol. 4: 406–425.

    Google Scholar 

  20. Weisburg WG, Barns SM, Pelletier D, Lane DJ (1991) Ribosomal DNA amplification for phylogenetic study. J Bacteriol. 173: 697–703.

    Google Scholar 

Download references

Author information

Affiliations

Authors

Corresponding author

Correspondence to Bo Mattiasson.

Rights and permissions

Reprints and Permissions

About this article

Cite this article

Vargas, V.A., Delgado, O.D., Hatti-Kaul, R. et al. Lipase-producing microorganisms from a Kenyan alkaline soda lake. Biotechnology Letters 26, 81–86 (2004). https://doi.org/10.1023/B:BILE.0000012898.50608.12

Download citation

  • alkaliphile
  • lipase
  • microbial isolation
  • soda lake
  • 16S rDNA sequencing