Outcomes from a Therapeutic Community for Homeless Addicted Mothers and Their Children

  • Stanley Sacks
  • JoAnn Y. Sacks
  • Karen McKendrick
  • Frank S. Pearson
  • Steve Banks
  • Michael Harle
Article

Abstract

A women's therapeutic community (TC) designed to prevent homelessness was evaluated using a quasi-experimental process. Propensity analysis selected comparable experimental (E) and comparison (C) participants. Significant improvements were found for the E group at the domain level, both in “psychological” dysfunction on symptoms (e.g., depression), and in “health,” including ratings of health and adherence to medication regimens. No significant difference was found at the domain level for “parenting” or “housing stabilization,” but specific outcomes did differ. For example, a greater number of children resided with the E group mothers who also assumed financial responsibility for more of their children.

homelessness mental illness substance abuse therapeutic community women and children 

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Copyright information

© Human Science Press, Inc. 2004

Authors and Affiliations

  • Stanley Sacks
    • 1
  • JoAnn Y. Sacks
    • 2
  • Karen McKendrick
    • 2
  • Frank S. Pearson
    • 2
  • Steve Banks
    • 3
  • Michael Harle
    • 4
  1. 1.Center for the Integration of Research and Practice (CIRP)National Development & Research Institutes, Inc. (NDRI)New York
  2. 2.Center for the Integration of Research and Practice (CIRP)National Development & Research Institutes, Inc. (NDRI)USA
  3. 3.University of Massachusetts Medical School in Worchester
  4. 4.Gaudenzia, IncNorristown

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