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Plant Foods for Human Nutrition

, Volume 58, Issue 3, pp 1–7 | Cite as

Chemical composition of two varieties of sorrel (Hibiscus sabdariffa L.), calyces and the drinks made from them

  • N.M. Nnam
  • N.G. Onyeke
Article

Abstract

Red and yellow varieties of sorrel calyces and the drinks made from them were examined for nutrient and antinutrient compositions. Fresh calyces from both varieties were purchased, cleaned and dried. The dried calyces were divided into two portions each. One portion from each variety was milled separately while the remaining portion of each was used to prepare sorrel drinks. Standard assay techniques were used to evaluate the calyces and the drinks made from them for nutrient and antinutrient compositions. Both varieties of the calyces contained appreciable quantities of carbohydrate, iron, ascorbate and Β carotene. The yellow variety had higher protein (9.08%) and ascorbate (56.83 mg/100 g) than the red variety. The calyces had traces of tannin, phytate and cyanide. The drink made with the red calyces contained more total solids, total sugar and cyanide but lower protein and ascorbate than the drink made with the yellow variety. The two varieties of sorrel calyces are promising sources of iron (800.67--833.00 mg/100 g) and Β carotene (281.28--285.29 RE/100 g).

Antinutrient Nutrient Sorrel calyces Sorrel drink 

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Copyright information

© Kluwer Academic Publishers 2003

Authors and Affiliations

  • N.M. Nnam
    • 1
  • N.G. Onyeke
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Home Science & NutritionUniversity of NigeriaNsukkaNigeria

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