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Tradition versus Technology: Careers Fairs in the 21st Century

  • Christiane Brennan
  • Margaret Daly
  • Eileen Fitzpatrick
  • Edward Sweeney
Article

Abstract

The traditional methods ofgraduate recruitment do not adequately meet theneeds of the changing profile of students andgraduates. As industry becomesinternationalised, the needs of employers arealso changing. Graduate recruitment is inresponse to short term needs and varying levelsof experience are required. A case study methodwas used in Dublin Institute of Technology toevaluate the effectiveness of a virtual careersfair in providing greater access to jobopportunities for students and graduates.Access by employers to potential employees wasalso measured. Findings showed that whileaccess improved, other issues requiringattention emerged.

Keywords

Traditional Method 21st Century Great Access Potential Employee Dublin Institute 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Kluwer Academic Publishers 2004

Authors and Affiliations

  • Christiane Brennan
    • 1
  • Margaret Daly
    • 1
  • Eileen Fitzpatrick
    • 1
  • Edward Sweeney
    • 1
  1. 1.Dublin Institute of Technology, Fitzwilliam HouseIreland

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