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International Journal of Speech Technology

, Volume 7, Issue 1, pp 93–99 | Cite as

Designing Language Models for Voice Portal Applications

  • Phil Shinn
  • Matthew Shomphe
  • Molly Lewis
  • Kathy Carey
  • David Kim
Article
  • 21 Downloads

Abstract

At HeyAnita we use statistical language models to improve speech recognition performance in a number of our portal applications, including driving directions, traffic, weather, stocks, sports, movies and restaurants. In this paper, language modeling implementations in different recognition environments and some real world data are reviewed.

language modeling speech recognition voice portal 

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Copyright information

© Kluwer Academic Publishers 2004

Authors and Affiliations

  • Phil Shinn
    • 1
  • Matthew Shomphe
    • 1
  • Molly Lewis
    • 1
  • Kathy Carey
    • 1
  • David Kim
    • 1
  1. 1.HeyAnita Inc.BurbankUSA

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