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International Journal of Primatology

, Volume 24, Issue 6, pp 1189–1205 | Cite as

Food Choice of White-Headed Langurs in Fusui, China

  • Zhaoyuan LiEmail author
  • Yi Wei
  • Elizabeth Rogers
Article

Abstract

We studied the feeding ecology of white-headed langurs (Trachypithecus leucocephalus) from September 1997 to September 1998 in Fusui Rare and Precious Animal Reserve, SW Guangxi, China. We collected data in the central part of a group of limestone hills where the main population pool of langurs was located. The langurs fed on 50 plant species (belonging to 42 genera from 28 families) out of 164 species in the habitat (belonging to 112 genera from 48 families). Most of the food plant species were not common in the habitat. There are 16 important food species, including 6 key species. White-headed langurs were extremely folivorous, feeding mainly on young leaves (75% of total feeding records) of a broad range of less common plant species, which were in less disturbed areas. Thus, langur groups in high quality habitat had greater access to preferred foods, and the future of langurs in the Reserve may depend on immediate cessation of tree felling.

food choice habitat quality Trachypithecus leucocephalus conservation China 

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Copyright information

© Plenum Publishing Corporation 2003

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Faculty of Conservation BiologySouthwest Forestry CollegeBailongsi, Kunming, YunnanPeoples Republic of China
  2. 2.Guangxi Forestry DepartmentNanning, GuangxiChina
  3. 3.ICAPB, The University of EdinburghEdinburghScotland

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