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Child and Adolescent Social Work Journal

, Volume 21, Issue 1, pp 25–45 | Cite as

The Pathways Model as Harm Minimization for Youth Gamblers in Educational Settings

  • Lia Nower
  • Alex Blaszczynski
Article

Abstract

Prevalence studies have indicated that a significant percentage of school-age youth exhibit problem or pathological gambling behaviors. However, to date there are few guidelines to assist educators in identifying those at risk and incorporating harm-reduction strategies into school curricula. This paper proposes using the Pathways Model of pathological gambling (Blaszczynski, 1998; Blaszczynski & Nower, 2002) as a harm-minimization strategy to guide social workers and other educators in effectively assessing, discriminating, and managing discrete subgroups of youth problem gamblers in educational settings and referring them to appropriate services. The Pathways Model asserts that a multiple range of specific psychological, biological, and socio-ecological variables interact at differential levels to form three distinct routes leading to the manifestation of superficially similar phenomenological characteristics and symptoms. It is argued that an understanding of the relevance and psychological implications of each separate pathway will greatly assist in the application of early intervention and prevention strategies, designed to effectively minimize the potential harm associated with youth problem gambling behaviors.

The Pathways Model Harm Minimization Youth Gamblers Educational Settings 

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Copyright information

© Human Sciences Press, Inc. 2004

Authors and Affiliations

  • Lia Nower
    • 1
  • Alex Blaszczynski
    • 2
  1. 1.University of Missouri-St. LouisSt. Louis
  2. 2.Department of PsychologyUniversity of SydneyAustralia

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