A Linear Algorithm for Computing the Homography from Conics in Correspondence

Abstract

This paper presents a study, based on conic correspondences, on the relationship between two perspective images acquired by an uncalibrated camera. We show that for a pair of corresponding conics, the parameters representing the conics satisfy a linear constraint. To be more specific, the parameters that represent a conic in one image are transformed by a five-dimensional projective transformation to the parameters that represent the corresponding conic in another image. We also show that this transformation is expressed as the symmetric component of the tensor product of the transformation based on point/line correspondences and itself. In addition, we present a linear algorithm for uniquely determining the corresponding point-based transformation from a given conic-based transformation up to a scale factor. Accordingly, conic correspondences enable us to easily handle both points and lines in uncalibrated images of a planar object.

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Sugimoto, A. A Linear Algorithm for Computing the Homography from Conics in Correspondence. Journal of Mathematical Imaging and Vision 13, 115–130 (2000). https://doi.org/10.1023/A:1026571913893

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  • conic correspondences
  • homography
  • uncalibrated images
  • tensor product
  • linear computation
  • 2-D objects