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Neuropsychology Review

, Volume 10, Issue 4, pp 183–211 | Cite as

Multiple Chemical Sensitivity: A Review of the Theoretical and Research Literature

  • Andrew S. Labarge
  • Robert J. McCaffrey
Article

Abstract

Multiple chemical sensitivity (MCS) is a term used to describe a disorder characterized by a vast array of somatic, cognitive, and affective symptoms, the cause of which is attributed to exposure to extremely low levels of a variety of chemicals. Upon examination of the patient with a diagnosis of MCS, objective physical findings and consistent laboratory abnormalities are typically nonexistent. The concept of MCS has ignited considerable controversy in the fields of toxicology, immunology, allergy, psychology, and neuropsychology. Central to the controversy is the disagreement over the extent to which the manifestation of MCS is mediated by psychological factors. Because of the large number of neuropsychological symptoms associated with a diagnosis of MCS, neuropsychologists are increasingly receiving referrals for the assessment of these patients. It is important, therefore, that neuropsychologists become aware of the variety of clinical issues that must be taken into account when assessing an individual with a diagnosis of MCS. The theoretical and research literature on individuals with a diagnosis of MCS is reviewed here.

Multiple chemical sensitivity 

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Copyright information

© Plenum Publishing Corporation 2000

Authors and Affiliations

  • Andrew S. Labarge
    • 1
    • 2
  • Robert J. McCaffrey
    • 1
  1. 1.University at Albany, State University of New York
  2. 2.JFK Johnson Rehabilitation Institute Center for Head InjuriesEdison

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