Agriculture and Human Values

, Volume 20, Issue 3, pp 301–321

Sustaining local agriculture Barriers and opportunities to direct marketing between farms and restaurants in Colorado

  • Amory Starr
  • Adrian Card
  • Carolyn Benepe
  • Garry Auld
  • Dennis Lamm
  • Ken Smith
  • Karen Wilken
Article

DOI: 10.1023/A:1026169122326

Cite this article as:
Starr, A., Card, A., Benepe, C. et al. Agriculture and Human Values (2003) 20: 301. doi:10.1023/A:1026169122326

Abstract

Research explored methods for “shortening the food links” or developing the “local foodshed” by connecting farmers with food service buyers (for restaurants and institutions) in Colorado. Telephone interviews were used to investigate marketing and purchasing practices. Findings include that price is not a significant factor in purchasing decisions; that food buyers prioritize quality as their top purchasing criterion but are not aware that local farmers can provide higher quality, that institutions are interested in buying locally; that small farms can offer comparable or higher quality produce andservice; and that farmers need to show buyers what the quality of produce and service they can provide.

Direct marketing Foodshed Localization Local economies Shortening food links Small farms Sustainable agriculture Sustainable development 

Copyright information

© Kluwer Academic Publishers 2003

Authors and Affiliations

  • Amory Starr
    • 1
  • Adrian Card
    • 3
  • Carolyn Benepe
    • 4
  • Garry Auld
    • 4
  • Dennis Lamm
    • 5
  • Ken Smith
    • 4
  • Karen Wilken
    • 4
  1. 1.Department of SociologyColorado State UniversityFort CollinsUSA
  2. 2.Department of SociologyColorado State UniversityFort CollinsUSA
  3. 3.Center for Environmental Farming SystemsNorth Caroline State UniversityRaleighUSA
  4. 4.Department of Food Science and Human NutritionColorado State UniversityFort CollinsUSA
  5. 5.Department of Animal ScienceColorado State UniversityFort CollinsUSA

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