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Journal of Autism and Developmental Disorders

, Volume 27, Issue 5, pp 571–593 | Cite as

The Role of Touch in Facilitated Communication

  • Emiko Kezuka
Article

Abstract

Imagine that one day a nonverbal autistic child suddenly starts to type messages, such as “I am not retarded,” using a computer keyboard while being touched by an assistant. Facilitated communication (FC) appears to create this miracle around the world. To understand how this works, experiments were conducted involving a “telepathy game” using a rod with an attached strain gauge. A force from the assistant, which controlled what was spelled through physical support, was measured. It was thus completely possible for any message to appear to be typed with FC regardless of the autistic child's actual knowledge or language ability.

Keywords

Strain Gauge Autistic Child Language Ability Actual Knowledge Computer Keyboard 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Plenum Publishing Corporation 1997

Authors and Affiliations

  • Emiko Kezuka
    • 1
  1. 1.Gunma Prefectural Women's UniversityUSA

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