Journal of Autism and Developmental Disorders

, Volume 27, Issue 5, pp 501–517 | Cite as

Diagnosing Autism: Analyses of Data from the Autism Diagnostic Interview

  • Catherine Lord
  • Andrew Pickles
  • John McLennan
  • Michael Rutter
  • Joel Bregman
  • Susan Folstein
  • Eric Fombonne
  • Marion Leboyer
  • Nancy Minshew
Article

Abstract

Results from ROC curves of items from two scales, the Autism Diagnostic Interview (ADI) and Autism Diagnostic Interview-Revised (ADI-R), operationalizing DSM-IV criteria for autism are presented for 319 autistic and 113 other subjects from 8 international autism centers. Analyses indicate that multiple items were necessary to attain adequate sensitivity and specificity if samples with varying levels of language were considered separately. Although considering only current behavior was generally sufficient when a combination cutoff and additive model was employed, predictive power was highest when history was taken into account. A single set of criteria, as operationalized by individually structured questions in the ADI/ADI-R, was effective in differentiating autism from mental handicap and language impairment in subjects with a range of chronological ages and developmental levels.

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Copyright information

© Plenum Publishing Corporation 1997

Authors and Affiliations

  • Catherine Lord
    • 1
  • Andrew Pickles
    • 2
  • John McLennan
    • 3
  • Michael Rutter
    • 2
  • Joel Bregman
    • 4
  • Susan Folstein
    • 5
  • Eric Fombonne
    • 6
  • Marion Leboyer
    • 7
  • Nancy Minshew
    • 8
  1. 1.Department of PsychiatryUniversity of ChicagoChicagoIllinois
  2. 2.MRC Child PsychiatryLondon
  3. 3.University of PittsburghUK
  4. 4.Emory UniversityFrance
  5. 5.New England Medical CenterFrance
  6. 6.INSERM Centre Alfred BinetParis
  7. 7.INSERM U155-Unite de Recherche on GenetiqueEpidernogiqueParis
  8. 8.University of PittsburghUSA

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