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Sex Roles

, Volume 37, Issue 5–6, pp 451–457 | Cite as

Correlates of Sexual Aggression Among Male University Students

  • Leandra Lackie
  • Anton F. de Man
Article

Abstract

Eighty-six male undergraduate university students in Canada participated in a study of the relation between sexual aggression and the variables of sex role stereotyping, fraternity affiliation, participation in athletics, hostility toward women, aggressive drive, aggressive attitude, alcohol use, and masculinity. Multiple regression analysis identified physical aggression, sex role stereotyping, and fraternity affiliation as best predictors of sexual aggression.

Keywords

Alcohol Regression Analysis Social Psychology Multiple Regression Analysis Good Predictor 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Plenum Publishing Corporation 1997

Authors and Affiliations

  • Leandra Lackie
    • 1
  • Anton F. de Man
    • 2
  1. 1.Bishop's UniversityCanada
  2. 2.Department of PsychologyBishop's UniversityLennoxvilleCanada

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