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Critical Criminology

, Volume 11, Issue 2, pp 113–135 | Cite as

The Continuing Relevance of Marxism to Critical Criminology

  • Stuart Russell
Article

Abstract

Since the early 1990s, the ``new directions'' in Critical Criminology have consciously excluded Marxism as being out-dated. This article critically assesses the fundamental theoretical shifts within critical criminology. It argues that Marxism remains as relevant as ever for analysing crime, criminal justice, and the role of the state. There is a great need for critical criminologists to redirect their attention back to Marxist theory by developing and extending its tools of critical theoretical analysis.

Keywords

Criminal Justice Social Justice White Collar Crime Critical Criminology Street Crime 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Kluwer Academic Publishers 2002

Authors and Affiliations

  • Stuart Russell
    • 1
  1. 1.Macquarie UniversitySydneyAustralia

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