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Diversity in Case Management Modalities: The Summit Model

Abstract

Though ubiquitous in community mental health agencies, case management suffers from a lack of consensus regarding its definition, essential components, and appropriate application. Meaningful comparisons of various case management models await such a consensus. Global assessments of case management must be replaced by empirical studies of specific interventions with respect to the needs of specific populations. The authors describe a highly differentiated and prescriptive system of case management involving the application of more than one model of service delivery. Such a diversified and targeted system offers an opportunity to study the technology of case management in a more meaningful manner.

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Peterson, G.A., Drone, I.D. & Munetz, M.R. Diversity in Case Management Modalities: The Summit Model. Community Ment Health J 33, 245–250 (1997). https://doi.org/10.1023/A:1025093612631

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  • DOI: https://doi.org/10.1023/A:1025093612631

Keywords

  • Public Health
  • Mental Health
  • Empirical Study
  • Health Psychology
  • Service Delivery