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Inner Communications Following the Near-Death Experience

Abstract

Inner communications following the near-death experience (NDE) have been reported by a number of authors. Although such communications are similar in some ways to the hallucinations heard by individuals with mental illness, they differ in that their effects are predominantly positive, whereas the hallucinations in mental illness exert predominantly negative effects. This article describes three individuals who reported experiencing inner communications subsequent to their NDEs. I suggest that these inner messages may be a form of intuition, and encourage further research into this phenomenon.

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Liester, M.B. Inner Communications Following the Near-Death Experience. Journal of Near-Death Studies 16, 233–248 (1998). https://doi.org/10.1023/A:1025074509260

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Keywords

  • Mental Illness