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Cancer Causes & Control

, Volume 14, Issue 5, pp 439–446 | Cite as

Reproductive factors and ovarian cancer risk in Jewish BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers (United States)

  • Francesmary Modugno
  • Roxana Moslehi
  • Roberta B. Ness
  • Deborah Brooks Nelson
  • Steven Belle
  • Jeffrey A. Kant
  • James E. Wheeler
  • Aimee Wonderlick
  • David Fishman
  • Beth Karlan
  • Harvey Risch
  • Daniel W. Cramer
  • Marie-Pierre Dube
  • Steven A. Narod
Article

Abstract

Objective: To determine whether oral contraceptive (OC) use, childbearing, breastfeeding and tubal ligation differ between ovarian cancer cases with and without a BRCA1/2 mutation. Methods: A case-only study of 242 Jewish women with invasive epithelial ovarian cancer. Women were genotyped for three Ashkenazi founder mutations (185delAG and 5382insC in BRCA1 and 6174delT in BRCA2). We obtained data on OC use, childbearing, breastfeeding, gynecologic surgeries and other reproductive factors from each woman. We compared the frequencies of these risk factors in carriers and non-carriers using unconditional logistic-regression, controlling for other covariates. Results: Among the 242 cases, 64 (26.4%) carried one of the BRCA1 founder mutations, and 31 (12.8%) carried the BRCA2 mutation. Although there were no differences in the percent of nulliparous women between carriers and non-carriers, parous BRCA1 carriers reported fewer live births than non-carriers (average of 2.1 versus 2.5 live births, OR = 0.61, 95%CI = 0.39–0.95, adjusted for age at diagnosis, tubal ligation and duration of OC use). Carriers and non-carriers did not differ in their history of breastfeeding, or in their lifetime use of OCs. BRCA1 carriers were more likely than non-carriers to have had a tubal ligation (25.0 versus 10.2%, OR = 3.67, 95%CI = 1.55–8.70, adjusted for age at diagnosis, number of live births and OC duration). Conclusions: In general, OC use, childbearing and breastfeeding do not differ between BRCA1/2 carriers and non-carriers with ovarian cancer. However, the effects of tubal ligation may differ between BRCA1 carriers and non-carriers.

BRCA1 oral contraceptives ovarian cancer parity 

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Copyright information

© Kluwer Academic Publishers 2003

Authors and Affiliations

  • Francesmary Modugno
    • 1
  • Roxana Moslehi
    • 2
  • Roberta B. Ness
    • 3
  • Deborah Brooks Nelson
    • 4
  • Steven Belle
    • 3
  • Jeffrey A. Kant
    • 5
  • James E. Wheeler
    • 6
  • Aimee Wonderlick
    • 7
  • David Fishman
    • 7
  • Beth Karlan
    • 8
  • Harvey Risch
    • 9
  • Daniel W. Cramer
    • 10
  • Marie-Pierre Dube
    • 2
  • Steven A. Narod
    • 2
  1. 1.Department of EpidemiologyUniversity of PittsburghPittsburghUSA
  2. 2.Centre for Research on Women's Health, Women's College HospitalUniversity of TorontoUSA
  3. 3.Department of EpidemiologyUniversity of PittsburghPittsburghUSA
  4. 4.Department of Clinical EpidemiologyUniversity of PennsylvaniaUSA
  5. 5.Department of PathologyUniversity of Pittsburgh School of MedicineUSA
  6. 6.Department of Pathology and Laboratory MedicineUniversity of PennsylvaniaUSA
  7. 7.Department of Obstetrics and GynecologyNorthwestern University Medical SchoolUSA
  8. 8.Department of Obstetrics and GynecologyCedars-Sinai Medical CenterLos AngelesUSA
  9. 9.Department of Epidemiology and Public HealthYale UniversityUSA
  10. 10.Department of Obstetrics, Gynecology and Reproductive BiologyBrigham and Women's HospitalUSA

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