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Motivation and Emotion

, Volume 27, Issue 2, pp 77–102 | Cite as

Attachment Theory and Affect Regulation: The Dynamics, Development, and Cognitive Consequences of Attachment-Related Strategies

  • Mario MikulincerEmail author
  • Phillip R. Shaver
  • Dana Pereg
Article

Abstract

Attachment theory (J. Bowlby, 1982/1969, 1973) is one of the most useful and generative frameworks for understanding both normative and individual-differences aspects of the process of affect regulation. In this article we focus mainly on the different attachment-related strategies of affect regulation that result from different patterns of interactions with significant others. Specifically, we pursue 3 main goals: First, we elaborate the dynamics and functioning of these affect-regulation strategies using a recent integrative model of attachment-system activation and dynamics (P. R. Shaver & M. Mikulincer, 2002). Second, we review recent findings concerning the cognitive consequences of attachment-related strategies following the arousal of positive and negative affect. Third, we propose some integrative ideas concerning the formation and development of the different attachment-related strategies.

attachment affect regulation personality development 

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Copyright information

© Plenum Publishing Corporation 2003

Authors and Affiliations

  • Mario Mikulincer
    • 1
  • Phillip R. Shaver
    • 2
  • Dana Pereg
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of PsychologyBar-Ilan UniversityRamat GanIsrael
  2. 2.Department of PsychologyUniversity of CaliforniaDavis

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