Autonomous Robots

, Volume 15, Issue 1, pp 53–66 | Cite as

An Adaptive Shared Control System for an Intelligent Mobility Aid for the Elderly

  • Haoyong Yu
  • Matthew Spenko
  • Steven Dubowsky

Abstract

The control system for a personal aid for mobility and health monitoring (PAMM) for the elderly is presented. PAMM is intended to assist the elderly living independently or in senior assisted living facilities. It provides physical support and guidance, as well as monitoring basic vital signs for users that may have both limited physical and cognitive capabilities. This paper presents the design of a bi-level control system for PAMM. The first level is an admittance-based mobility controller that provides a natural and intuitive human machine interface. The second level is an adaptive shared controller that allocates control between the user and the computer based on metrics of the user's performance. Field trials at an eldercare facility show the effectiveness of the design.

adaptive control elderly shared PAMM 

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Copyright information

© Kluwer Academic Publishers 2003

Authors and Affiliations

  • Haoyong Yu
    • 1
  • Matthew Spenko
    • 1
  • Steven Dubowsky
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Mechanical EngineeringMassachusetts Institute of TechnologyCambridgeUSA

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