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Masculinity and Emotionality: An Investigation of Men's Primary and Secondary Emotional Responding

Abstract

In this study, we investigated the role of masculinity in men's affect intensity and men's fear of emotions. Men's masculine ideology and self-reported masculine gender role stress were assessed as cognitive and experiential factors of adherence to traditional masculine gender norms. Masculine ideology was negatively related to men's global affect intensity. However, on a 3-factor model of affect intensity, only negative reactivity was significantly related to masculine ideology. Both masculine ideology and masculine gender role stress were positively related to men's fear of emotions. Results are discussed in the context of theories of gender differences in emotion.

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Correspondence to Matthew Jakupcak.

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Jakupcak, M., Salters, K., Gratz, K.L. et al. Masculinity and Emotionality: An Investigation of Men's Primary and Secondary Emotional Responding. Sex Roles 49, 111–120 (2003). https://doi.org/10.1023/A:1024452728902

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  • DOI: https://doi.org/10.1023/A:1024452728902

  • masculinity
  • affect intensity
  • fear of emotions