Biotechnology Letters

, Volume 25, Issue 13, pp 1031–1036 | Cite as

Multiple displacement amplification prior to single nucleotide polymorphism genotyping in epidemiologic studies

  • Gregory J. Tranah
  • Pamela J. Lescault
  • David J. Hunter
  • Immaculata De Vivo

Abstract

We assessed the whole genome amplification strategy, known as multiple displacement amplification (MDA), for use with the TaqMan genotyping platform for DNA samples derived from two case-control studies nested in the Nurses' Health Study and the Physicians' Health Study. Our objectives were to (1) quantify DNA yield from samples of varying starting concentrations and (2) assess whether MDA products give an accurate representation of the original genomic sequence. Multiple displacement amplification yielded a mean 23 000-fold increase in DNA quantity and genotyping results demonstrate 99.95% accuracy across six SNPs from four genes for 352 samples included in this study. These results suggest that MDA will provide a sufficiently robust amplification of limiting samples of genomic DNA that can be used for SNP genotyping in large case-control studies of complex diseases.

genotype multiple displacement amplification polymorphism single nucleotide Taq Mar whole genome amplification 

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Copyright information

© Kluwer Academic Publishers 2003

Authors and Affiliations

  • Gregory J. Tranah
    • 1
  • Pamela J. Lescault
    • 2
    • 3
  • David J. Hunter
    • 1
    • 3
  • Immaculata De Vivo
    • 1
    • 3
  1. 1.Department of Epidemiology and Harvard Center for Cancer PreventionHarvard School of Public HealthBostonUSA
  2. 2.Harvard Center for Cancer PreventionHarvard School of Public HealthBostonUSA
  3. 3.Channing Laboratory, Department of MedicineBrigham and Women's Hospital and Harvard Medical SchoolBostonUSA

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