Journal of Applied Psychoanalytic Studies

, Volume 5, Issue 3, pp 269–281 | Cite as

An Attachment Perspective on Reunions in Couple Psychoanalytic Psychotherapy

  • Christopher Clulow
Article
  • 16 Downloads

Abstract

Psychoanalysis has been slow to acknowledge attachment theory as one of its own. Yet traditions of observational and representational research associated with it have much to offer in shedding light on intrapsychic as well as interpersonal phenomena. This paper explores these traditions and their potential clinical utility for couple psychoanalytic psychotherapy. In particular, attention is drawn to behaviour and representations associated with the experience of reunion in therapy sessions.

couple therapy attachment psychoanalysis reunion research 

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Copyright information

© Human Sciences Press, Inc. 2003

Authors and Affiliations

  • Christopher Clulow
    • 1
  1. 1.The Tavistock Marital Studies InstituteTavistock CentreLondonEngland

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