Transgenic Research

, Volume 12, Issue 3, pp 363–367 | Cite as

Expression of the Bovine Growth Hormone Alters the Root Morphology in Transgenic Tobacco Plants

  • Kyunghee Oh
  • Ban Yoon Cheon
  • Sung Hyun Cho
  • Hoang Quoc Truong
  • Sung Han Ok
  • Ji Ung Jeung
  • Jang Won Choi
  • Jeong Sheop Shin

Abstract

The bovine growth hormone (bGH) is a natural peptide hormone that controls the differentiation, growth and metabolism, and is produced in the pituitary gland of cows. For the production of bGH from plants, two different bgh clones, of which the pGAbGH1 contaions only mature peptide sequences and the pGAbGH15 contains signal sequences and the first intron, as well as mature peptide sequences, were used. Those bghs under the control of the CaMV 35S promoter and NOS terminator were introduced to tobacco plants via Agrobacterium tumefaciens-mediated transformation. By PCR analyses using bgh and nptII specific primers, 17 and 21 putative transformants were respectively selected from pGAbGH1- and pGAbGH15-transformed tobacco plants. Northern blot analysis showed that the most of the transgenic lines expressed the bgh mRNA. Western blot analysis revealed that the pGAbGH1-transformed tobaccos produced recombinant bGH, but pGAbGH15-transformed ones did not produce the protein. Interestingly, some morphological changes were observed in the roots of transgenic tobacco plants. The transgenic tobacco plants had thick and short roots containing few root hairs in contrast to the non-transformed wild type plants.

Agrobacterium-mediated transformation bovine growth hormone (bGH) phenotypic change transgenic tobacco 

Preview

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

References

  1. Albright LM, Yanofsky MF, Leroux B, Ma DQ and Nester EW (1987) Processing of the T-DNA of Agrobacterium tumefaciens generates border nicks and linear, single-stranded T-DNA. J Bacteriol 169(3): 1046–1055.Google Scholar
  2. Ann RK, Nikolov ZL and John AH (1997) Production of recombinant proteins in transgenic plants: practical considerations. Biotech Bioeng 56(5): 473–484.Google Scholar
  3. Choi JW and Lee SY (1996) Optimization of the bovine growth hormone gene expression in E. coli. Mol Cell 6(6): 712–718.Google Scholar
  4. Fischer R and Emans N (2000) Molecular farming of pharmaceutical proteins. Transgenic Res 9(4-5): 279–299.Google Scholar
  5. Gray G, Selzer G, Buell G, Shaw P, Escanez S, Hofer S et al. (1984) Synthesis of bovine growth hormone by Streptomyces lividans. Gene 32(1-2): 21–30.Google Scholar
  6. Hood EE, Witcher DR, Maddock S et al. (1997) Commercial production of avidin from transgenic maize: characterization of transformant, production, processing, extraction and purification. Mol Breed 3(4): 291–306.Google Scholar
  7. Hsiung HMand MacKellar WC (1987) Expression of bovine growth hormone derivatives in Escherichia coli and the use of the derivatives to produce natural sequence growth hormone by cathepsin C cleavage. Methods Enzymol 153: 390–401.Google Scholar
  8. Iglesias VA, Moscone EA, Papp I, Neuhuber F, Michalowski S, Phelan T et al. (1997) Molecular and cytogenetic analyses of stably and unstably expressed transgene loci in tobacco. Plant Cell 9(8): 1251–1264.Google Scholar
  9. Izadyar F, Zeinstra E and Bevers MM (1998) Follicle-stimulating hormone and growth hormone act differently on nuclear maturation while both enhance developmental competence of in vitro matured bovine oocytes. Mol Reprod 51(3): 339–345.Google Scholar
  10. James EA, Wang C, Wang Z, Reeves R, Shin JH, Magnuson NS et al. (2000) Production and characterization of biologically active human GM-CSF secreted by genetically modified plant cells. Protein Expr Purif 19(1): 131–138.Google Scholar
  11. Leung FC, Jones B, Steelman SL, Rosenblum CI and Kopchick JJ (1986) Purification and physiochemical properties of a recombinant bovine growth hormone produced by cultured murine fibroblasts. Endocrinology 119(4): 1489–1496.Google Scholar
  12. Ma JK, Hiatt A, Hein M, Vine ND, Wang F, Stabila P et al. (1995) Generation and assembly of secretory antibodies in plants. Science 268(5211): 716–719.Google Scholar
  13. Magnuson NS, Linzmaier PM, Reeves R, An G, HayGlass K and Lee JM (1998) Secretion of biologically active human interleukin-2 and interleukin-4 from genetically modified tobacco cells in suspension culture. Protein Expr Purif 13(1): 45–52.Google Scholar
  14. McAndrew SJ, Chen NY, Wiehl P, DiCaprio L, Yun J, Wagner TE et al. (1991) Expression of truncated forms of the bovine growth hormone gene in cultured mouse cells. J Biol Chem 266(31): 20965–20969.Google Scholar
  15. Parmenter DL, Boothe JG, van Rooigen GJ, Yeung EC and Moloney MM (1995) Production of biologically active hirudin 367 in plant seeds using oleosin partitioning. Plant Mol Biol 29(6): 1167–1180.Google Scholar
  16. Secchi C and Borromeo V (1997) Bovine growth hormone as an experimental model for studies of protein-protein interactions. J Chromatogr Biomed Sci 688(2): 161–177.Google Scholar
  17. Seeburg PH, Sias S, Adelman J, de Boer HA, Hayflick J, Jhurani P et al. (1983) Efficient bacterial expression of bovine and porcine growth hormones. DNA 2(1): 37–45.Google Scholar
  18. Staub JM, Garcia B, Graves J, Hajdukiewicz PT, Hunter P, Nehra N et al. (2000) High-yield production of a human therapeutic protein in tobacco chloroplasts. Nat Biotechnol 18(3): 333–338.Google Scholar
  19. Verwoerd TC, Van Paridon PA, van Ooyen AJ, van Lent JW, Hoekema A and Pen J (1995) Stable accumulation of Aspergillus niger phytase in transgenic tobacco leaves. Plant Physiol 109(4): 1199–1205.Google Scholar
  20. Woychik RP, Camper SA, Lyons RH, Horowitz S, Goodwin EC and Rottman FM (1982) Cloning and nucleotide sequencing of the bovine growth hormone gene. Nucleic Acids Res 10(22): 7197–7210.Google Scholar

Copyright information

© Kluwer Academic Publishers 2003

Authors and Affiliations

  • Kyunghee Oh
    • 1
  • Ban Yoon Cheon
    • 1
  • Sung Hyun Cho
    • 1
  • Hoang Quoc Truong
    • 1
  • Sung Han Ok
    • 1
  • Ji Ung Jeung
    • 1
  • Jang Won Choi
    • 2
  • Jeong Sheop Shin
    • 1
  1. 1.Graduate School of Biotechnology, Korea UniversitySeoulKorea
  2. 2.Division of Life ScienceCollege of Natural Resources, Daegu UniversityKyungsanKorea

Personalised recommendations