Skip to main content

Student Discipline and Alleviating Criminal Behavior in the Inner City

Abstract

It is reasonable to assume that sound student-discipline practices and methods of alleviating criminal behavior are grounded in a sound philosophy. Developing individual locus of control through comprehensive methods is a proactive approach to encouraging behavior modification in or outside the school building. This approach is consonant with the philosophy espoused by pragmatists such as John Dewey and several scholars of motivational theory. Within this context, student-discipline policies in one inner-city elementary school were developed through seminar and focus group sessions comprising education and social work professors, university students, and education/social work practitioners. Emanating from these discussions are solutions (supported by the literature) to school violence and discipline problems within urban school systems which are comparatively different from remedies suggested by a citywide (St. Louis) violence task force. Recommendations are based on an interactionist theory of student discipline and viewing the school as an integrative process promoting internal control. Suggestions include holding high expectations of all students, coaching for self-discipline, modeling appropriate behaviors, multisystem and multisector involvement, home-school linkages, and viewing “teaching” as an art.

This is a preview of subscription content, access via your institution.

REFERENCES

  • Allen, W. (1995). Expert predicts dramatic rise in killings by teens. St. Louis Post-Dispatch 117(49): 13B.

    Google Scholar 

  • Barber, B. (1993). America skips school: Why we talk so much about education and do so little. Harper's Magazine 287(1722): 39-46.

    Google Scholar 

  • Bryan B. and J. Little. (1993). Student, 17, fatally shot at Sumner. St. Louis Post-Dispatch 115(85): 1A.

    Google Scholar 

  • Children's Defense Fund. (1994). Yearbook on the State of America's Children. Washinton D. C.: U. S. Government Printing Office.

    Google Scholar 

  • Currie, E. (1985). Confronting Crime: An American Challenge. New York: Pantheon Books.

    Google Scholar 

  • Deci, E. (1975). Intrinsic Motivation. New York: Plenum Press.

    Google Scholar 

  • Decker, S. and D. Smith. (1992). No single solution for gang problem. St. Louis Post-Dispatch 114(282): 3C.

    Google Scholar 

  • Dewey, J. (1916). Democracy and Education. New York: Macmillan.

    Google Scholar 

  • Goodman, S. and Kreidler, W. (1993). You need lots of choices: Conflict resolution in the elemen-tary grades. Promising Practices in Teaching Social Responsibility. New York: Holt Rinehart.

    Google Scholar 

  • Herzberg, F. (1968, January-February). One more time: How do you motivate employees? Harvard Business Review, pp. 53-62.

  • The Holmes Group (1990). Tomorrow's Schools: Principles for the Design of Professional Develop-ment Schools. East Lansing, MI: Holmes Group.

    Google Scholar 

  • Howe, H. (1993). Thinking about Our Kids. New York: Free Press.

    Google Scholar 

  • Ledewitz, B. (1992). Why family values faltered: Capitalism. St. Louis Post-Dispatch 114(281): 3C.

    Google Scholar 

  • Little, J. (1995). "Training urged on the handling of school violence. "St. Louis Post-Dispatch 117(323): 1A.

    Google Scholar 

  • Maslow, A. (1954). Motivation and Personality. New York: Harper & Row.

    Google Scholar 

  • Messner, S. and R. Rosenfeld. (1993). Crime and the American Dream. Belmont, CA: Wadsworth Publishing.

    Google Scholar 

  • Missouri Department of Elementary and Secondary Education (1990). Teaching All Children: A Principal's Guide to Serving At-Risk Youth. Jefferson City, MO: Author.

    Google Scholar 

  • National Commission on Teaching and America's Future (1996). What Matters Most: Teaching for America's Future. Woodbridge, VA: Author.

    Google Scholar 

  • Ozmon, H. and S. Graver. (1990). Philosophical Foundations of Education (4th ed.). Columbus, OH: Merrill.

    Google Scholar 

  • Piaget, J. (1962). Play, Dreams and Imitation in Childhood. New York: Norton.

    Google Scholar 

  • Rand. (1996). Focus on crime and drug policy. RAND Research Review. Santa Monica, CA: Drug Policy Research Center.

    Google Scholar 

  • Redden, G. (1993). Children are not resilient. St. Louis Post-Dispatch 115(259): 7B.

    Google Scholar 

  • Rich, J. (1985). Innovative School Discipline. New York: Holt Rinehart.

    Google Scholar 

  • Rogers, C. (1983). Freedom to Learn for the 80's. Columbus, OH: Merrill.

    Google Scholar 

  • Shalala, D. (1993). Band together to fight violence. St. Louis Post-Dispatch 115(350): 11B.

    Google Scholar 

  • Skinner, B. (1971). Beyond Freedom and Dignity. New York: Bantam.

    Google Scholar 

  • Sprinthall, N. and L. Thies-Sprinthall. (1983). The teacher as an adult learner: A cognitive-develop-mental view. In G. Griffin (ed. ), Staff Development: Eighty-Second Yearbook of the National Society for the Study of Education, Part II (pp. 13-35). Chicago: University of Chicago Press.

    Google Scholar 

  • Sturz, H. (1971). Interviewed for the New York Times as cited in Our Cities Bum While We Play Cops and Robbers by B. Botein, 1972. New York: Simon & Schuster.

    Google Scholar 

  • U. S. Justice Department. (1994). Report on Inmate Populations. Washington D. C.: U. S. Govern-ment Printing Office.

    Google Scholar 

  • Vandenburg, D. (1971). Being and Education: An Essay in Existential Phenomenology. Englewood Cliffs, NJ: Prentice Hall.

    Google Scholar 

  • Weiss, R. (1987). The community and prevention. In E. Johnson (ed.), Handbook on Crime and Delinquency Prevention. Westport, CT: Greenwood Press.

    Google Scholar 

  • Wilson, J. (1985). Thinking about Crime. New York: Vintage Books.

    Google Scholar 

  • Wilson, W. J. (1987). The Truly Disadvantaged: The Inner City, the Underclass, and Public Policy. Chicago: University of Chicago Press.

    Google Scholar 

Download references

Author information

Authors and Affiliations

Authors

Rights and permissions

Reprints and Permissions

About this article

Cite this article

Ward, C.M. Student Discipline and Alleviating Criminal Behavior in the Inner City. The Urban Review 30, 29–48 (1998). https://doi.org/10.1023/A:1023285328962

Download citation

  • Issue Date:

  • DOI: https://doi.org/10.1023/A:1023285328962

Keywords

  • Education Research
  • Group Session
  • Criminal Behavior
  • Urban School
  • Motivational Theory