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Lap Reading for Young at-Risk Children: Introducing Families to Books

Abstract

Many at-risk children do not experience lap reading to the degree their more advantaged peers do. To investigate the effects lap reading might have on such children, three families with at-risk children were taught lap reading techniques and were provided with books for lap reading over a 12- to 16-week period. Changes in the children's behavior included choosing books and reading as free-time activities, developing positive attitudes toward books, and persisting in attending to books in the face of other activity choices. Additional outcomes included an increase in higher level questions asked by the children, some improvement in their oral language, and an increase in literacy-specific knowledge. Lap reading is recommended as a tool for parents to increase instructional motivation for their at-risk children.

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Gregory, L.P., Morrison, T.G. Lap Reading for Young at-Risk Children: Introducing Families to Books. Early Childhood Education Journal 26, 67–77 (1998). https://doi.org/10.1023/A:1022995027819

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  • DOI: https://doi.org/10.1023/A:1022995027819

  • reading aloud
  • parental involvement
  • at-risk learners
  • motivation