Estimating the Organizational Costs of Sexual Harassment: The Case of the U.S. Army

Abstract

A general model for estimating the organizational costs of sexual harassment in the workplace is proposed along with model-specific costing formulas. A partial implementation of the model is applied to sexual harassment incidence data for the Army gathered as part of a large-scale survey of the U.S. military services. Results indicate that the total annual cost of sexual harassment in the U.S. Army in 1988 was over $250,000,000. Organizational implications are discussed.

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Correspondence to Robert H. Faley.

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Faley, R.H., Knapp, D.E., Kustis, G.A. et al. Estimating the Organizational Costs of Sexual Harassment: The Case of the U.S. Army. Journal of Business and Psychology 13, 461–484 (1999). https://doi.org/10.1023/A:1022987119277

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Keywords

  • General Model
  • Social Psychology
  • Social Issue
  • Sexual Harassment
  • Annual Cost