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Letters of Recommendation: What Information Captures HR Professionals' Attention?

Abstract

HR professionals evaluated the credentials of job candidates based upon actual letters of recommendation (LORs). The LORs contained both relevant and irrelevant information about the job candidate. Policy capturing revealed that professionals differed in both their consistency in evaluating candidates and in the relative weights they gave various forms of information. Some sex differences in decision policies also were discovered. Results are discussed in terms of how to strengthen the LOR as a selection tool.

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Tommasi, G.W., Williams, K.B. & Nordstrom, C.R. Letters of Recommendation: What Information Captures HR Professionals' Attention?. Journal of Business and Psychology 13, 5–18 (1998). https://doi.org/10.1023/A:1022962814637

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  • DOI: https://doi.org/10.1023/A:1022962814637

Keywords

  • Social Psychology
  • Social Issue
  • Relative Weight
  • Decision Policy
  • Irrelevant Information