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Perception of Emotion: Measuring Decoding Accuracy of Adult Prosodic Cues Varying in Intensity

Abstract

The purpose of the present study was to present a measure of the ability to decode emotion in the voices of adults. After describing the process of how the Diagnostic Analysis of Nonverbal Accuracy—Adult Prosody (DANVA2-AP) test was constructed, five propositions were developed to guide the gathering of appropriate construct validity evidence for the measure. Evidence from a series of studies provided support for all of the propositions. It was concluded that the DANVA2-AP had satisfactorily met the minimal requirements for construct validity.

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Baum, K.M., Nowicki, S. Perception of Emotion: Measuring Decoding Accuracy of Adult Prosodic Cues Varying in Intensity. Journal of Nonverbal Behavior 22, 89–107 (1998). https://doi.org/10.1023/A:1022954014365

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Keywords

  • Social Psychology
  • Construct Validity
  • Minimal Requirement
  • Validity Evidence
  • Diagnostic Analysis