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Easing the Pain of Divorce Through Children's Literature

Abstract

This article describes children's typical reactions to divorce, as well as practical techniques that teachers and caregivers can use in helping children deal with this issue. The use of bibliotherapy is described as a means to help children. An annotated bibliography of select literature is provided, along with a description of developmentally appropriate activities than can be used with these titles.

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Kramer, P.A., Smith, G.G. Easing the Pain of Divorce Through Children's Literature. Early Childhood Education Journal 26, 89–94 (1998). https://doi.org/10.1023/A:1022951212798

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  • bibliotherapy
  • divorce
  • children's literature
  • preschool