Leisure and Its Role as a Strategy for Coping with Work Stress

Abstract

The purpose of this study was to determine the dimensions of leisure that were important to people coping with work-related stress. Data were provided by 695 principals and deputy principals from secondary schools throughout New Zealand who were experiencing major legislative and organizational change in the education sector. The results produced a robust, replicable, and reliable two-factor structure using FACTOREP, a factor replication procedure. It appears that leisure is best measured in terms of active-challenge and passive-recuperative dimensions when considered in relation to coping with work-related stress. The results show that for the present occupational group, the passive nature of leisure is more important for coping with work stress. These results have implications for those involved in workplace health promotion where the emphasis thus far has been on physical activity and fitness. The results also confirm the importance of determining the most appropriate number of factors to rotate.

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Correspondence to Linda Trenberth.

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Trenberth, L., Dewe, P. & Walkey, F. Leisure and Its Role as a Strategy for Coping with Work Stress. International Journal of Stress Management 6, 89–103 (1999). https://doi.org/10.1023/A:1022928326410

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  • work stress
  • coping
  • leisure
  • passive-recuperative leisure
  • active-challenging leisure
  • FACTOREP