Teaching Respect in the Classroom: An Instructional Approach

Abstract

Teachers frequently are asked to address misbehavior in the classroom. To minimize the negative effects of reactive, punishment-based classroom management strategies, proactive instructional approaches are recommended. The Cool Tool is a social skills strategy designed to teach and encourage prosocial behaviors in the classroom and larger school environment. This case study utilized the Cool Tool with 26 middle school students across two classroom settings to teach “Respect to Adults” and “Respect to Peers.” A decrease in inappropriate behaviors was observed across both settings when the Cool Tool was initiated. Decreased rates of inappropriate behavior maintained for two months. Implications, limitations, and recommendations are discussed.

This is a preview of subscription content, access via your institution.

REFERENCES

  1. Bain, A., & Farris, H. (1991). Teacher attitudes toward social skills training. Teacher Education and Special Education, 14(1), 49–56.

    Google Scholar 

  2. Bulkeley, R., & Cramer, D. (1994). Social skills training with young adolescents: Group and individual approaches in a school setting. Journal of Adolescence, 17, 521–531.

    Google Scholar 

  3. Colvin, G., Kameenui, E. J., & Sugai, G. (1993). School-wide and classroom management: Reconceptualizing the integration and management of students with behavior problems in general education. Education and Treatment of Children, 16, 361–381.

    Google Scholar 

  4. Colvin, G., & Sugai, G. (1988). Proactive strategies for managing social behavior problems: An instructional approach. Education and Treatment of Children, 11, 341–348.

    Google Scholar 

  5. Colvin, G., Sugai, G., & Patching, B. (1993). Precorrection: An instructional approach for managing predictable problem behaviors. Intervention in School and Clinic, 28, 143–150.

    Google Scholar 

  6. DuPaul, G. J., & Eckert, T. L. (1994). The effects of social skills curricula: Now you see them, now you don't. School Psychology Quarterly, 9, 113–132.

    Google Scholar 

  7. Haring, N. G. (1988). Generalization for students with severe handicaps: Strategies and solutions. Seattle, WA: University of Washington Press.

    Google Scholar 

  8. Hollinger, J. D. (1987). Social skills for behavioral disordered children as preparation for mainstreaming: Theory, practice, and new directions. Remedial and Special Education, 8(4), 17–27.

    Google Scholar 

  9. Horner, R. H., Bellamy, G. T., & Colvin, G. T. (1984). Responding in the presence of nontrained stimuli: Implications of generalization error patterns. Journal of the Association for Persons with Severe Handicaps, 9, 287–295.

    Google Scholar 

  10. Hughes, J. M., & Sullivan, K. A. (1988). Outcome assessment in social skills training with children. Journal of School Psychology, 26(2), 167–183.

    Google Scholar 

  11. Jones, R. N., Sheridan, S. M., & Binns, W. R. (1993). School-wide social skills training: Providing preventive services to students at-risk. School Psychology Quarterly, 8, 57–80.

    Google Scholar 

  12. Landrum, T. J., & Lloyd, J. W. (1992). Generalization in social behavior research with children and youth who have emotional or behavioral disorders. Behavior Modification, 16, 593–616.

    Google Scholar 

  13. Lewis, T. J. (1994). A comparative analysis of the effects of social skill training and teacher-directed contingencies on social behavior of preschool children with disabilities. Journal of Behavioral Education, 4, 267–281.

    Google Scholar 

  14. Mathur, S. R., & Rutherford, R. B. (1991). Peer-mediated interventions promoting social skills of children and youth with behavioral disorders. Education and Treatment of Children, 14, 227–242.

    Google Scholar 

  15. Mayer, G. R. (1995). Preventing antisocial behavior in the schools. Journal of Applied Behavior Analysis, 28, 467–478.

    Google Scholar 

  16. Mayer, G. R., Butterworth, T., Nafpaktitis, M., & Sulzer-Azaroff, B. (1983). Preventing school vandalism and improving discipline: A three-year study. Journal of Applied Behavior Analysis, 16, 355–369.

    Google Scholar 

  17. McKinney, J. D., Mason, J., Perkerson, K., & Clifford, M. (1975). Relationship between classroom behavior and academic achievement. Journal of Educational Psychology, 67, 198–203.

    Google Scholar 

  18. Moore, L. A. (1994). The effects of social skills curricula: Were they apparent initially? School Psychology Quarterly, 9, 133–136.

    Google Scholar 

  19. Ogilvy, C. M. (1994). Social skills training with children and adolescents: A review of the evidence on effectiveness. Educational Psychology, 14, 73–83.

    Google Scholar 

  20. Stokes, T. F., & Baer, D. M. (1977). An implicit technology of generalization. Journal of Applied Behavior Analysis, 10, 349–367.

    Google Scholar 

  21. Strain, P. S., & Odom, S. L. (1986). Peer social initiations: Effective intervention for social skills development of exceptional children. Exceptional Children, 52, 542–551.

    Google Scholar 

  22. Strayhorn, J. M., Strain, P. S., & Walker, H. M. (1993). The case for interaction skills training in the context of tutoring as a preventative mental health intervention in schools. Behavior Disorders, 19, 11–26.

    Google Scholar 

  23. Sugai, G. (1992). Instructional design: Applications of teaching social behavior. Learning Disabilities Forum, 17, 20–23.

    Google Scholar 

  24. Sugai, G., Geisen, C., & Fernandez, E. (1995). The Cool Tool: A social skills teaching format. Behavioral Research and Teaching. University of Oregon, Eugene.

    Google Scholar 

  25. Sugai, G. M., & Horner, R. H. (1994). Including students with severe behavior problems in general education settings: Assumptions, challenges, and solutions. The Oregon Conference Monograph, 6, 109–120.

    Google Scholar 

  26. Sugai, G., & Horner, R. (1996). Discipline and behavioral support: Preferred processes and practices. Unpublished manuscript. Behavioral Research and Teaching, University of Oregon, Eugene.

  27. Sugai, G., & Lewis, T. J. (1996). Preferred and promising practices for social skills instruction. Focus on Exceptional Children, 29(4), 1–22.

    Google Scholar 

  28. Taylor-Greene, S., Brown, D., Nelson, L., Longton, J., Gassman, Cohen, J., Swartz, J., Horner, R. H., Sugai, G., & Hall, S. (1997). School-wide behavioral support: Starting the year off right. Journal of Behavioral Education, 7, 99–112.

    Google Scholar 

  29. Walker, H. M., Colvin, G., & Ramsey, E. (1995). Antisocial behavior in school: Strategies and best practices. Pacific Grove: Brooks/Cole Publishing Company.

    Google Scholar 

  30. Wolery, M. R., Bailey, D. B., Jr., & Sugai, G. (1988). Effective teaching: Principles and procedures of applied behavior analysis with exceptional children. Boston, MA: Allyn & Bacon.

    Google Scholar 

Download references

Author information

Affiliations

Authors

Rights and permissions

Reprints and Permissions

About this article

Cite this article

Langland, S., Lewis-Palmer, T. & Sugai, G. Teaching Respect in the Classroom: An Instructional Approach. Journal of Behavioral Education 8, 245–262 (1998). https://doi.org/10.1023/A:1022839708894

Download citation

  • encourage prosocial behavior
  • efficient and effective teaching approach
  • adaptable lesson plan format