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The Making of Multiple Personality Disorder: A Social Constructionist View

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Abstract

This article explores the social construction of multiple personality disorder by analyzing professional agreements about the nature of the diagnosis, while locating these within their historical and cultural context. First, a historical review of the disorder traces various overlapping streams of discourse that have shaped the construction of the diagnosis. This is followed by a cross-cultural comparison of MPD and dissociative phenomena in several non-Western societies. The article concludes with some reflections on the cultural meanings of MPD in contemporary America.

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Hartocollis, L. The Making of Multiple Personality Disorder: A Social Constructionist View. Clinical Social Work Journal 26, 159–176 (1998). https://doi.org/10.1023/A:1022819001682

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