Simultaneous Amplification of Terahertz Difference Frequencies by an Injection-Seeded Semiconductor Laser Amplifier at 850 nm

  • Shuji Matsuura
  • Pin Chen
  • Geoffrey A. Blake
  • J. C. Pearson
  • Herbert M. Pickett
Article

Abstract

Two-frequency operation of an 850 nm semiconductor optical amplifier was achieved by simultaneously injection seeding it with two diode lasers. The two frequencies could be independently amplified without strong interference when they were separated by more than 10 GHz, and the spectral purity was preserved by the amplification process. At frequency differences below 10 GHz, unbalanced two-frequency output was observed, which can be explained by a two-mode interaction driven by the refractive index modulation at the beat frequency. The laser system is suitable for the difference-frequency generation of coherent terahertz radiation in ultra-fast photoconductors or nonlinear optical media.

Semiconductor laser amplifier Two-frequency injection seeding Difference-frequency generation Submillimeter Terahertz Coherent radiation 

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Copyright information

© Plenum Publishing Corporation 1998

Authors and Affiliations

  • Shuji Matsuura
    • 1
  • Pin Chen
    • 1
  • Geoffrey A. Blake
    • 1
  • J. C. Pearson
    • 2
  • Herbert M. Pickett
    • 2
  1. 1.Division of Geological and Planetary SciencesCalifornia Institute of TechnologyPasadena
  2. 2.Jet Propulsion LaboratoryCalifornia Institute of TechnologyPasadena

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