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Calcium, vitamin D, dairy products, and risk of colorectal cancer in the Cancer Prevention Study II Nutrition Cohort (United States)

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Abstract

Objective: Calcium, vitamin D, and dairy product intake may reduce the risk of colorectal cancer. We therefore examined the association between these factors and risk of colorectal cancer in a large prospective cohort of United States men and women. Methods: Participants in the Cancer Prevention Study II Nutrition Cohort completed a detailed questionnaire on diet, medical history, and lifestyle in 1992–93. After excluding participants with a history of cancer or incomplete dietary information, 60,866 men and 66,883 women remained for analysis. During follow-up through 31 August 1997 we documented 421 and 262 cases of incident colorectal cancers among men and women, respectively. Multivariate-adjusted rate ratios (RR) were calculated using Cox proportional hazards models. Results: Total calcium intake (from diet and supplements) was associated with marginally lower colorectal cancer risk in men and women (RR = 0.87, 95% CI 0.67–1.12, highest vs lowest quintiles, p trend = 0.02). The association was strongest for calcium from supplements (RR = 0.69, 95% CI 0.49–0.96 for ≥500 mg/day vs none). Total vitamin D intake (from diet and multivitamins) was also inversely associated with risk of colorectal cancer, particularly among men (RR = 0.71, 95% CI 0.51–0.98, p trend = 0.02). Dairy product intake was not related to overall risk. Conclusions: Our results support the hypothesis that calcium modestly reduces risk of colorectal cancer. Vitamin D was associated with reduced risk of colorectal cancer only in men.

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McCullough, M.L., Robertson, A.S., Rodriguez, C. et al. Calcium, vitamin D, dairy products, and risk of colorectal cancer in the Cancer Prevention Study II Nutrition Cohort (United States). Cancer Causes Control 14, 1–12 (2003). https://doi.org/10.1023/A:1022591007673

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